Rajiv Jhangiani, Ph.D.

Open Education, SoTL, Psychology

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Principles vs. Publishers

This is been an interesting week. Yesterday I made the decision to formally withdraw a chapter from an edited volume about themes for teaching Introductory Psychology. It was not an easy decision because I had put a lot of thought and energy into the chapter, made the necessary revisions, and even saw it accepted by the editors more than a year ago (a change in editorial staff at Cengage prompted the massive delay). So you can imagine my surprise a few weeks ago when I received a very curious email from a “Product Manager” at Cengage. Continue reading

The opposite of open is broken

The opposite of open is not closed; the opposite of open is broken. The more I think about it, the more this cogent observation, made by John Wilbanks, resonates with me. Continue reading

Idealism or pragmatism? A false dichotomy in four tweets

Continue reading

Are open textbooks the end game?

“I don’t want to be part of a movement that is focused on replacing static, over-priced textbooks with static, free textbooks.” I hope Robin DeRosa’s thoughtful post about open textbooks provokes some reflection on the tone and goals of the open textbook movement and its advocates. It begs the question of whether we are waging the wrong war here, at least in part. Continue reading

Pilot testing open pedagogy

This summer, as has become usual practice for me, I adopted open textbooks for my Introductory Psychology and Social Psychology sections (produced by NOBA and the BC Open Textbook Project, respectively); however, my desire to enjoy a semester entirely free from traditional textbooks was challenged by the absence of a high quality open textbook for Cognitive Psychology. Continue reading

Tunnelling up: Announcing a new book project

A measure of salvation by cujoquan. Retrieved from https://flic.kr/p/Lnp6f CC-BY-NC-SA 2.0

The open education community is multidisciplinary and consists of passionate and intrinsically motivated leaders. In inspiring one another, we serve as caretakers of our mutual flame. We are the core. Continue reading

Textbooks? Where we’re going we don’t need textbooks!

Back to the future time machine

As many of you will remember, 2015 is the “future” year in the beloved 1985 film “Back to the Future.” Although this may make you chuckle, I believe that Doc Brown had it right and that at least part of the future is here.

Consider this: In a now-famous blog post, David Wiley argued that “using OER the same way we used commercial textbooks misses the point. It’s like driving an airplane down the road. Yes, the airplane has wheels and is capable of driving down on the road (provided the road is wide enough). But the point of an airplane is to fly at hundreds of miles per hour – not to drive. Driving an airplane around, simply because driving is how we always traveled in the past, squanders the huge potential of the airplane.”

As always, David makes an important point in a persuasive fashion. But let me add what I believe is the perfect meme to his argument with a slightly amended version of the famous final scene of the iconic film:Doc Brown meme

From believer to dOER

It was in May of 2013 that I first heard David Wiley speak about open textbooks. That experience catalyzed my involvement with reviewing, adopting, and adapting open educational resources (OER). In May of 2014 I heard David speak once again (as the keynote speaker at last year’s Open Textbook Summit). Since then I have been immersed in research projects on the impact and efficacy of OER, advocacy as a Faculty Fellow with BCcampus (including a number of workshops at universities in BC), and a second open textbook revision. Of course all of this means that it has been rather too long since my last post and that I have a number of open education-related updates to share:

1. I recently concluded the data collection phase of a major survey of BC faculty who have adopted open educational resources (OER) in the classroom. The online survey was a collaboration with BCcampus, with whom I work as a Faculty Fellow (along with Christina Hendricks and Jessie Key), and Beck Pitt of the UK-based OER Research Hub. We are currently in the process of analyzing these data but the preliminary results look very promising. Among other things, the responses to the survey will shed more light on the types of OER that faculty have been using, their motivations for using OER, barriers, enablers, and a host of other contextual information that will help us to develop roadmaps for OER adoption and adaptation within the BC post-secondary context.

2. I just launched a major survey of BC students aimed at assessing the impact of open textbook adoption on their personal and educational outcomes, including cost savings, employment status, course performance, and program completion rates.

3. I am collaborating with my colleagues Farhad Dastur and Richard Le Grand in carrying out a quasi-experimental investigation of the impact of open textbook adoption on students taking introductory psychology at KPU.

4. Also with Farhad Dastur, I developed a course on Research Methods in Psychology for Thompson Rivers University’s Open Learning Division and the OERu. The course is unique in that it has been constructed entirely with OER and resides in Wikieducator.

5. I am putting the finishing touches to a chapter I wrote titled “Unleashing openness in the teaching of introductory psychology.” The chapter will be published later this year in a book about Thematic Approaches to Teaching Introductory Psychology. As soon as it is ready I will post a copy on this site. [Update (May 24, 2015): A pre-publication copy is now available online].

6. I co-facilitated a webinar during Open Education week titled “Distinguishing the dOERs” during which Beck Pitt and I shared some data from our research on faculty adopters and adapters of OER.

7. Over the next few months I will give a number of presentations about open textbooks, open educational resources, and open pedagogy at a variety of meetings and conferences, including the following:

  • “Using open pedagogy to promote critical skill development” at the Teaching Introductory Psychology – North West Conference
  • “Giving psychology away: The impact of open textbook adoption on psychology students” at the 2015 Psychology Articulation Meeting.
  • “An openness to openness: The terrifying and liberating process of disrupting higher education” – the keynote address at the 2015 Open Textbook Summit. Vancouver, Canada
  • “Academic librarians and OER: Access, advocacy, and activism” at the 2015 BC Library Conference, Vancouver, Canada.

I am looking forward to each of these but was especially honoured to be invited to deliver the keynote address at the Open Textbook Summit. I am not yet certain that I am deserving of following in David’s footsteps but will do my darndest to deliver a memorable experience.

8. Finally, I should say that it has been wonderful to see the Open Education movement get so much local press lately. Given that awareness of OER is still a major barrier, I have been delighted to see press releases from the Ministry of Advanced Education, an interview with CBC Radio, and articles in the Surrey Now, Indo-Canadian Voice, Chilliwack Times, and The Link feature our work. This coverage really helps raise awareness and build momentum which, together with a supportive institutional culture, will create more many more believers and, I daresay, a few more dOERs.

OER for Psychology

Later this week Farhad Dastur and I will present at a symposium at the Annual Conference on the Teaching of Psychology in Atlanta, organized by the Society for the Teaching of Psychology. Our symposium is titled “Opening up psychology: Adopting open textbooks, open pedagogy, and an open philosophy in the classroom.” The following is a list of some Psychology-specific OER for those who attend our symposium. It is not an exhaustive list by any means but is a start: [Click here to download the list: Psychology OER]

NOBA Project: http://nobaproject.com/

BC Open Textbook Project: http://open.bccampus.ca/

Resources for Teaching Research and Statistics in Psychology: http://www.teachpsychscience.org/

Go Cognitive: http://www.gocognitive.net

Cognitive Psychology Wiki: http://cognitivepsychology.wikidot.com/

STP Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology: http://teachpsych.org/otrp/resources/index.php

APA Online Psychology Laboratory: http://opl.apa.org/

Personality Pedagogy: http://personalitypedagogy.arcadia.edu/

Animations for Teaching: http://garyfisk.com/anim/index.html

Social Psychology Teaching Resources: http://www.socialpsychology.org/teaching.htm

Timothy Bender’s Memory & Cognition Demonstrations: http://courses.missouristate.edu/timothybender/mem/mydemos.html

Rossman/Chance Applet Collection: http://www.rossmanchance.com/applets/index.html

Consortium for the Advancement of Undergraduate Statistics & Education: https://www.causeweb.org/webinar/activity/

Interpreting Correlations: http://rpsychologist.com/d3/correlation/

The Brain from Top to Bottom: http://thebrain.mcgill.ca/

Research Methods Knowledge Base: http://www.socialresearchmethods.net/kb/

Fostering Sustainable Behavior (textbook): http://www.cbsm.com/pages/guide/preface/

TED Ed: Psychology: http://ed.ted.com/lessons?category=psychology

Psychology Tutorials & Animations: http://psych.hanover.edu/Krantz/tutor.html

 

Other General Repositories & Providers of OER

MIT Open Courseware: http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/brain-and-cognitive-sciences/

Saylor Academy Library: https://saylor.longsight.com/

OpenStax College: http://openstaxcollege.org/books

OpenStax CNX: http://cnx.org/

Merlot: http://www.merlot.org/

OER commons: https://www.oercommons.org/browse/keyword/psychology

The Fellowship of the Open

Over the past year I have had the pleasure of working with the fine folk at BCcampus a fair bit – first as a reviewer of two open textbooks, then as an adopter of three, adapter of two, organizer of an open test bank sprint, and a co-presenter at professional development workshops at Capilano University and Kwantlen Polytechnic University. So when I saw another potential excuse to spend time with Mary, Amanda, and Clint, I couldn’t help but apply for one of three Faculty Fellow positions with their open education program.

Today was the first meeting of us fellows – Christina Hendricks (UBC Philosophy) and Jessie Key (VIU Chemistry) are the other two – at BCcampus headquarters in Victoria. We received a briefing about the status of the Open Textbook Project and discussed our roles over the next year (mainly research, advocacy, & feedback to the OT team). In some ways this will be a continuation of our efforts thus far but there are many new opportunities as well (e.g., outreach within our disciplines and to student groups, presenting at the next Open Textbook summit in Vancouver, research funding, etc.). I am especially pleased to lead the research initiative, including an online survey of BC faculty that Clint and I have been working on recently with Beck Pitt (OER Research Hub) that is almost ready for launch, and that fits very well within my own research agenda at KPU.

Christina and Jessie are already doing remarkable work in the open arena and I look forward to working closely with them. Our mandate is thrilling, we have great support at BCcampus, and I believe we will collectively be able to help tangibly advance the open education agenda here in BC.

The Future is Open (https://creativecommons.org/weblog/entry/43164) by Luke Surl under CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)

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